Larceny in the Military

Larceny

Larceny

In recent years, there has been an increase in financial crimes such as larceny throughout the United States. This crime carries many punishments if the accused is convicted. In addition to the penalties that are imposed by a civilian criminal court are penalties imposed by certain employers. If you are a member of the military, you will receive additional penalties for being arrested and charged with a crime. Having a criminal conviction can prevent you from being admitted into the military, and it can cause you to be discharged if you are already a member of the military.

To prevent serious consequences that can impact your career, it is important that you find the right lawyer to protect your rights and defend your case. Let Bansley Anthony provide that attorney for you. The attorneys at our law firm have experience with the defense of financial crimes such as larceny, and we also have experience with military defense. We know the military laws, punishments, and your rights. Understanding the issues that you face with your career can help us protect you. For more information about our law firm, our military service, and how we can help you if you are a military member charged with larceny, you can contact us here. For more information on how a larceny charge will impact your life and career, please check out our free information on this page.

What is Larceny?

Larceny is a form of theft that you can be charged with if you steal property. There are six degrees of larceny ranging from first to sixth degree larceny. The degrees of larceny are based around the amount of money or the value of the property that you allegedly stole. If you are accused of stealing less than $1,000, this is considered a misdemeanor, and you will face less serious penalties. If you steal over $1,000, this is a felony, and you will face larger fines and prison sentences if convicted.

Court Process

If you are arrested for larceny by a civilian law enforcement agent, you will first and foremost be prosecuted for larceny by the civilian criminal court system. The basic steps involved in the court process include:

The Arrest

The first step in a larceny charge being brought against you is your arrest. A law enforcement agent will arrest you if he or she has reasonable suspicion that you are guilty of larceny or if he or she has a warrant from a judge for your arrest. Depending on the severity of the charge, you might be given court documentation and a court date, or you may be taken to the police station. If necessary, a bail hearing will be held to determine the price of your bond. A judge will set bail after considering factors such as your criminal history, the severity of the crime you are charged with, and more.

Gathering Evidence

The next step that you should take if charged with larceny is gathering evidence for your defense. Hiring a criminal defense lawyer can greatly help in this stage of the process. A lawyer will know what kind of defense will work best in your case and can take care of paperwork and gathering evidence for you.

Pre-Trial Negotiations

You and your lawyer can meet with the prosecution to see if a plea bargain is the right course of action for your situation. If the prosecution does not have a strong case, they might offer a plea bargain which will help you avoid trial. It is very important that you have a lawyer present during negotiations to make sure that your rights are protected and you receive the best deal possible. A criminal defense lawyer can also help you weigh the pros and cons of taking a plea bargain. Keep in mind that a plea bargain will not be offered in every case, so this stage of the process might not be available to you.

Trial

If the defense and the prosecution cannot come to an agreement, the case will go to trial where it will be decided by a jury. If you are found not guilty, you will be free to go. If you are found guilty, you will face the following penalties:

Civilian Penalties

First Degree Larceny

If you are charged with first degree larceny, you are accused of stealing over $10,000. This is a Class B felony, punishable by:

  • A prison sentence of 1-20 years
  • A fine of up to $15,000.

 

Second Degree Larceny

If you are charged with second degree larceny, it means that you are accused of stealing between $5,000-10,000. This is a Class C felony, and it is punishable by:

  • A prison sentence of 1-10 years
  • A fine of up to $10,000.

 

Third Degree Larceny

If you are charged with third degree larceny, it means that you are accused of stealing between $1,000-5,000. This is considered a Class D felony, and is punishable by:

  • A 1-5 year prison sentence
  • A fine of up to $5,000.

 

Fourth Degree Larceny

If you are charged with fourth degree larceny, it means that you are accused of stealing between $500-1,000 worth of merchandise. This is a Class A misdemeanor, and it is punishable by:

  • Up to one year in jail
  • A fine of up to $2,000.

 

Fifth Degree Larceny

If you are charged with fifth degree larceny, it means that you are accused of stealing between $250-500. This is a Class B misdemeanor, and is punishable by:

  • Up to six months in jail
  • A fine of up to $1,000.

 

Sixth Degree Larceny

If you are charged with sixth degree larceny, it means that you are accused of stealing less than $250 worth of property. This is a Class C misdemeanor, and is punishable by:

  • Up to three months in jail
  • A fine of up to $500.

 

Military Punishments

In addition to the civilian punishments listed above, you might injure your career if you are convicted of larceny. If you are trying to apply for the military, you will either be disqualified from applying or it will become very difficult to be accepted into the military if you have a larceny conviction on your record. If you are currently in the military, and you are charged on base, you will face a court marital procedure in which the military can impose it’s own punishments. Even if you are not arrested on a military base, you will likely will face some sort of corrective action from your command These penalties can range from a suspension or loss of privileges to a discharge from the military. Your punishments will largely depend on the factors of your individual case.

To protect yourself as best as you can, you should hire a lawyer to defend you against both military and civilian punishments. You can learn more by contacting us today.